Of Interpreters, Schools and Courts: an Analysis of the Postcolonial Themes of Language, Education, and Power in Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

3276 Words Apr 27th, 2014 14 Pages
James Clifford T. Santos
Dr. Jocelyn Martin
LIT 127.2 (Postcolonial Literature II)
Ateneo De Manila University
10 February 2014 Of Interpreters, Schools, and Courts: An Analysis of the Postcolonial Themes of Language, Education, and Power in Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart
Through his awareness of the European literary tradition of negatively stereotyping the African natives as uncivilized peoples and putting the West in the pedestal in terms of cultural superiority and advancement (Guthrie 51-52), it can be asserted that the renowned African novelist and intellectual Chinua Achebe may had realized, at one point in his life, that in order to have a more realistic portrayal of the dynamics of Western and non-Western contact,
…show more content…
Towards its ending, the paper shall explain how the Ibo have become subalterns in the novel, with special regard to the dynamic changes that the native Nigerian societies presumably have experienced in the novel due to the English colonizers’ assertion and imposition of their religion and government. The paper shall end by presenting a brief synthesis of the prominence of the themes of language, education, and power in postcolonial discourse.
In the novel, there is no doubt that the English colonizers have not only brought their religion in Umuofia and the other native African villages or towns, but also their system of education. Missionaries such as Mr. Kiaga and Mr. Brown are revealed to have established and managed schools whose primary orientation is to teach the Christian converts, particularly the young ones, Western knowledge and how to read and write using the English language (Achebe 152; 179). It is understandable for the novel to portray such because it has been proven throughout history that in any place where a “system of religious communication” exists, a systematic “common instruction” of the local populace, particularly the youth, is required in order to promote the understanding of

Related Documents